Aerial view of current site and new relocation site of Coels Shed in Cowes.

COELS Shed, a small historical building located behind the Cowes Cultural Centre, will be relocated to the Phillip Island Community and Learning Centre (PICAL) community garden.
The shed was built by Paul Rudolph Coels more than 80 years ago and is located on the site for the future Cowes Transit Centre and All Day Car Park.
At the August Ordinary Council Meeting, Bass Coast Shire Council agreed to allocate $25,000 from the 2018/19 surplus to fund the relocation of Coels Shed to PICAL which is situated close by, next to its current location.
Mayor Pamela Rothfield said the Coels Shed is classified by the National Trust of Australia as a ‘Historical Workshop’ and has historical significance for the Phillip Island community.
“Because of its historical significance, it was important that key elements were considered when finding a suitable home,” Cr Rothfield said.
“The new home needs to be accessible to the community and have no entrance fees attached, be in a safe location where it can be protected from vandalism, be able to tell a story, and the new custodians would take on the responsibility of maintaining the upkeep of the shed.
“Ticking all of these boxes and being located just next door, The PICAL community garden was the perfect fit.”
Consultation with an advisory group comprised of representatives from Bass Coast Shire Council, Phillip Island Historical Society and the National Trust of Australia, identified the criteria for a suitable new location.
Bass Coast Shire Council will relocate the shed to the PICAL site and support any immediate restoration works, ensuring the building is structurally sound when handed over to PICAL.
The shed will be relocated before November 2018 to allow for civil earthworks for the new Transit Centre and All-Day Carpark to take place.
For more updates on the Cowes Revitalisation Projects, which includes the Transit Centre and All Day Car Park, visit the council’s website: basscoast.vic.gov.au/CowesRevitalisation