Members of the VicRoads Shaker Unit Anthony Harris and Kevin Taylor check over Peter Stoitse Transport driver Aldo Gasperini’s rig. D094815

Members of the VicRoads Shaker Unit Anthony Harris and Kevin Taylor check over Peter Stoitse Transport driver Aldo Gasperini’s rig. D094815

Leongatha Secondary College student Jonah Ball, who is interested in a job as a mechanic, tests out a big-rig for size. The truck was also set up to show a truck’s blind spots. D084815.

Leongatha Secondary College student Jonah Ball, who is interested in a job as a mechanic, tests out a big-rig for size. The truck was also set up to show a truck’s blind spots. D084815.

DRIVERS and operators, students and pre-drivers were given insight into the transport industry during a specially organised Truck Safety Day at the Leongatha saleyards on Friday.
Police and VicRoads were out in force during the day, but it wasn’t to give tickets.
VicRoads had its heavy vehicle inspection trailer, colloquially known as the “truck shaker”.
The shaker tests the vehicle’s brakes, suspension and steering, as well as simulating “on the road” conditions to detect any loose parts.
“The shaker is an opportunity for drivers to see how it operates, without worrying about a ticket,” John Ernst from the Gippsland Safe Freight Network Program said.
“It’s a chance for drivers to try out the shaker, using it as a diagnostic tool, rather than an enforcement one.”
Mr Ernst said if any issues were identified, drivers can take their vehicles back to the depot, fix it, and hopefully run checks over their other vehicles too.
There was information also available to operators, with examples of new safety features in new vehicles, or ways to retro-fit vehicles.
Local students attended, some of whom are completing VET Auto at the South Gippsland Trades and Skills Alliance.
More than 20 career paths were identified, from driving and mechanics, to logistics, IT and more.
In addition, the students, many of whom will undergo their Learner tests soon, sat in the trucks to see firsthand what it would be like driving a truck.
The truck was set up with cars placed in blind spots.
“I could only see the roof of one car [out of four],” said Year 11 Leongatha Secondary College student Jonah Ball.
“It was surprising how little I could see.
“I’ve still got a couple of months to go before I go for my Ls, but it has made me think of how I’ll drive when trucks are around.”