This ‘Daisy Bug’ VW created a fair bit of interest at the recent Korumburra Swap Meet.

This ‘Daisy Bug’ VW created a fair bit of interest at the recent Korumburra Swap Meet.

There’s no mistaking the sleek lines of this E-type Jag in an impressive line-up of cars at the Korumburra Swap Meet recently.

There’s no mistaking the sleek lines of this E-type Jag in an impressive line-up of cars at the Korumburra Swap Meet recently.

IT HAS been claimed that the chance to cut the price of car registration from $700 down to $142 in Victoria has been behind the rise and rise in interest in classic cars in recent times.
In fact the number of Victorian vehicles on club permits was 8500 in 2010. It has now boomed to 65,000.
But the truth is that most of those who take the trouble to buy or build, own and maintain a car over 25 years of age, plus join a car club, are actually classic car enthusiasts who participate in all aspects of the sub-culture.
And recently, at the Korumburra Swap Meet, many examples of their interesting pastime was there for all to see.
What’s not to like about taking your partner on a ride through the South Gippsland countryside on the weekend, stopping off for a picnic, a coffee or just enjoying life at a more leisurely pace.
But there are some hoons and cheapskates taking advantage of the cheaper rego for classic car enthusiasts and bona-fide clubs, Vicroads and the State Government is determined to weed them out with new rules being introduced in 2015.
The new rules include the following:
• When signing new club permit applications, club safety officers/scrutineers will be required to complete a Vehicle Eligibility and Standards Declaration form declaring that the vehicle is eligible, safe for use on the road and that it meets the applicable requirements for the category of vehicle for which the club permit is sought.
• Initial club permit applications (not renewals) for vehicles manufactured after 31 December 1948 will need to be accompanied by a current certificate of roadworthiness.
• Initial club permit applications (not renewals) will need to be accompanied with a document of proof of ownership or management of the vehicle.
• For pre-1949 vehicles, clubs will continue to conduct their own safety inspection (which may be a certificate of roadworthiness or a club safety inspection based on VicRoads’ guidelines).
• New modification guidelines specified in the Guidelines for modifications to vehicles operated under Victoria’s Club Permit apply.
• If an initial club permit application is submitted for a vehicle that is modified outside of the appropriate modification guidelines, a Vehicle Assessment Signatory Scheme (VASS) approval certificate covering the modifications must be provided with the permit application.
• An “M” club permit plate will be issued to identify modified vehicles where a VASS certificate has been provided.
• Clubs are required to maintain dated photographs of vehicles entering the club permit scheme in accordance with the new Club Permit Agreement.
Among existing and ongoing requirements worthy of note include:
There are two important existing, ongoing requirements that permit applicants and club safety officers/scrutineers need to be aware of:
• Motor vehicles manufactured outside of Australia after 31 December 1968 (30 June 1975 in the case of motorcycles) which do not have a previous Australian registration history, must have a VASS approval certificate to demonstrate that the vehicle meets the Australian Design Rules that applied at the time the vehicle was manufactured.
• Club permit vehicles must comply with the Vehicle Standards, appropriate to the date the vehicle was manufactured, contained in Schedule 2 of the Road Safety (Vehicles) Regulations 2009.
Clubs have to provide VicRoads with a current list of office bearers and safety officers/scrutineers together with sample signatures and driver licence numbers.