THERE’S more to grass than you might think. It turns out that managing your pasture is critical for a successful grazing enterprise.
Suitable species selection and the correct balance of soil nutrients can have a big influence on your bottom dollar.
If you’re looking to gain a clearer understanding of how different pasture species grow, and how they can be influenced by soil conditions and stocking rates, then be part of a free pasture management workshop in March.
The workshop is being delivered by Small Farming Specialist David Stewart at a beef farm owned by Mark Walters on Sunday, March 6 from 10am to 4pm, 535 Bass Valley Road, Loch.
Participants will get hands on experience with pasture species identification, and gain insight into the optimum soil conditions for healthy pasture growth.
David has extensive experience with pasture management and helping producers maximise growth and feed value of pastures having successfully delivered pasture workshops for Landcare Networks across Victoria.
There is no charge for the workshop, however registrations are essential for course material.
Registrations close Monday, February 29 to the South Gippsland Landcare Network on 5662 5759 or sgln@landcare.net.
Morning tea is provided, but please BYO lunch.
David Stewart is a graduate from Marcus Oldham Farm Management College in Geelong, and throughout his career has spent time working as a farm manager, delivering chemical courses, working as a Senior Chemical Standards Officer, working within the Small Landholder Information Services department at the Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources (DEDJTR) and writing articles in the Weekly Times Farm magazine.
David has also obtained other qualifications throughout his career including a Graduate Diploma in Sustainable Agriculture and a Diploma in Technical Teaching.
This workshop is supported by the South Gippsland Landcare Network through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program and the Port Phillip and Westernport Catchment Management Authority.