Mayor Jordan Crugnale and Manager for Sustainable Environment Deidre Griepsma are dedicated to educating the public about what waste goes in which bin. Ms033216

Mayor Jordan Crugnale and Manager for Sustainable Environment Deidre Griepsma are dedicated to educating the public about what waste goes in which bin. Ms033216

Council will be providing each household with a kitchen caddy and green compostable bin liners made from corn starch. These green bags will be replaced on a fortnightly basis when the bins are collected, but will also be available for free from the council. Ms023216

Council will be providing each household with a kitchen caddy and green compostable bin liners made from corn starch. These green bags will be replaced on a fortnightly basis when the bins are collected, but will also be available for free from the council. Ms023216

IN AN attempt to clarify some of the confusion surrounding the new three bin system, the Bass Coast Shire Council has broken down the contents of an average household’s waste and sorted it into its appropriate bin.
Mayor of Bass Coast, Jordan Crugnale, said that the time between now and when the bins are implemented in September 2017 will be spent educating the public, and attempting to change attitudes regarding disposal of waste.
“We want to generate a discussion regarding our waste and our recycling,” Cr Crugnale said.
“It’s about trying to take some personal responsibility for the waste that we create.”
The three bin system, which involves the implementation of a new green waste bin and the reduction in pick-up of general waste from once a week to once a fortnight has sparked controversy across the community.
Some members of the community are concerned about hygiene, pest, and odours emanating from the general waste bin.
However, the council stressed that the items with the potential to smell and attract pests, such as food scraps, meat and seafood, will still be picked up once a week.
It is estimated that up to 72 per cent of the contents of the current general waste bin will be streamlined into the new green waste organics bin.
Deidre Griepsma, the council’s manager for Sustainable Environment, explained several ways that families and homeowners can reduce the amount of general waste that they generate.
“By rinsing out milk containers with hot water, you both clean the container and free it from odours, and also shrink the plastic bottle so it fits more compactly in your recycling,” Ms Griepsma said.
“We’re also providing the kitchen caddy, which you can easily put on your kitchen bench to help sort out your food waste.
“Most of the waste that is removed once a week via the current system will still be taken away on a weekly basis. Instead of it being placed in the general waste bin, households will have to sort it into the new green waste bin instead.”
There is opportunity for households to upgrade the size of their general waste bin if needed.
The Bass Coast Shire is the 12th council across Victoria to implement such a system, and the first in the Gippsland region, a fact of which Cr Crugnale is proud.
“This kind of system will hopefully encourage people to think about what it is they are consuming and then throwing away.
“Over the next year we aim to educate people about how to correctly use the new system and get them sorting their waste accordingly instead of simply chucking it all away and not thinking about it,” Cr Crugnale said.
“This decision is also beneficial financially, as it will generate savings from the capital works that would otherwise be required to construct a brand new landfill sometime in the future, because we’ve filled our existing landfill with rubbish.
“We want to reduce what is being thrown into landfill.”
“Again, it’s about turning our waste into a commodity, and not a liability.”
The new three bin system will take effect as of September 2017.