By Tom McNish

PLOD: A means of communication between shifts for miners.

Often miners would leave instructions written in thick chalk ‘plod’ for following shifts.

Since Carolyn Landon moved to the area in 2005 she has written 136 Plod essays.

Carolyn spoke at Thursday’s 15 Minutes of History.

“When I came to the Historical Society in 2005, I was eager to interview the older generations of Italians to hear their stories,” Carolyn said.

“My husband and I couldn’t get into the museum then, but eventually we crossed paths with the group, and I found out Irene Williams was also interviewing Italian stories,” she said.

Drafting plod essays would often require long drafts, up to 6000-words.

“I interview someone and edit the story to make them fit into what we’re doing,” she said.

Carolyn also works with others to help them record their own stories.

“I’m particularly proud of the essays Kit Sleeman did. Obviously his memories are very important,” Carolyn said.

“His essay on the sounds of Wonthaggi make you realise what this place was,” she said.

Much of Wonthaggi’s written history has been recorded through the Plod.

Carolyn has written on various topics from Truganini at Wonthaggi, The Remarkable Memory of Charles Street, The Wonthaggi Monster and many more.

Carolyn has worked with Historical Society president Fay Quilford for more than 10 years.

Fay’s father-in-law was a long-time president of the Historical Society.

“When I first came to Jim’s family home in ’71, it was the house with the bull wagon,” Fay said.

“The directions were, you drive here and it’s the house with the bullock wagon, that’s where you go,” she said.

“The second living room was completely lined with all of the books and history and memorabilia because Arthur collected them, from Tom Gannon donations and that’s what’s here in the museum.”

“A lot of people will get the Plod emails and will look for the essays.”

“For anyone who is interested in becoming a Historical Society member and receiving the Plod, annual membership is $20,” Fay said.

To read Plod essays visit wonthaggihistoricalsociety.org.au/index.php/plod.